Friday, February 21, 2014

Is There A Future For Bolehland?

Bolehland is a blessed country.

Blessed with rich natural resources, including oil.

A clement weather, except that it can be sweltering sometimes.

No natural disasters to talk of, except for the manageable Monsoon floods.

Blessed with a multi racial population that have been living in harmony until recent times, or at least until the tenure of Hussein Onn.

But since the term of the man some would prefer to call the Malaysian Mad Hatter, things have got steadily from bad to worse.

We have an administration that is increasingly losing touch with the issues plaguing the country - corruption, economic inertia, racial and religious tensions, rising crime rate and costs of living, all brought about because leaders are more concerned with their own fat welfare and even fatter butts.

An administration whose understanding of the economy consists of confounding acronyms and perennial budget deficits that have ballooned the sovereign debt sky high, and threatening to bankrupt the country rich in oil and natural and human resources.

Whose subsidy rationalisation exercises are but pathetic assays to cover up its profligacy and lack of understanding of how to run the economy, instead of running it to the ground.

An administration that is more concerned with its own survival and isn't adverse to exploiting race, religion and the monarchy to its purpose. Which might very well explain why it seems unable, or unwilling, to put a brake to the daily racial baiting and religious provocations that is getting out of hand?

And, of course, Bolehlanders themselves are not completely free of blame.

For, were they not the ones who have been voting in the clowns to run the country for so many years since independence in 1957?

Never mind that the last time around, 53% of voters had actually said 'no' to the clowns, though the latter still managed to go on to form the government of the day and run the circus, courtesy of an electoral system that favours constituency gerrymandering.

So, is there a future for Malaysia?

No, if the incumbent ruling coalition continues to hold the reins of power.

Yes, if they were voted out the next GE14!

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Kluang's Little Bangsar

Kluang's Little Bangsar
Click To Visit

Kamini's Indian Wedding - Click To Visit

Kamini's Indian Wedding - Click To Visit
I attended my neighbour's daughter's Indian wedding dinner at the Sentul HGH Convention Centre. Click for a peek

Yasmin Ahmad - Click To Visit

Yasmin Ahmad - Click To Visit
Yasmin Ahmad was arguably Malaysia's best story-teller, filmmaker and advertiser. She was well known for her Petronas commercials and had won numerous international awards including the Golden Lion award for the 'Tan Ming Hong In Love' commercial. Her feature film Sepet not only garnered her several international awards including for Best Asian Film but also drew multi-racial audiences that rarely happens for a local film.

Genting Highlands - Click To Visit

Genting Highlands - Click To Visit
Genting Highlands Is A Popular Retreat With A Casino

Batu Caves - Click To Visit

Batu Caves - Click To Visit
Malaysia's Famous Landmark. Note The Statue Of Lord Muruga And The 272 Steps To The Temple Cave In The Background

Petronas Twin Towers And KLCC Park - Click To Visit

Petronas Twin Towers And KLCC Park - Click To Visit
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Some Early Morning Views Of KL City Skyline - Click To Visit

Some Early Morning Views Of KL City Skyline - Click To Visit
Some early morning views of the KL city sykline I took from the 3rd floor of the KL Court with a low-pixel hand-phone camera

Kluang Town - Click To Visit

Kluang Town - Click To Visit
Kluang was a sleepy hollow, but is fast becoming a bustling town. You can't miss the bust-shaped gunung Lambak lording over the place and the town is well known for its tv brand coffee powder

Kluang RailCoffee

Kluang RailCoffee
The Kluang railway station coffee shop, now re-branded Kluang RailCoffee, is well known for its cuppa of coffee and the charcaol grilled piping hot buns oozing with butter and kaya...It used to attract standing-room only crowds. It still does, but the last time I was there it wasn't a good experience for me. The famous coffee had somewhat lost its oomph and even the buns...The shop has a long and noted history being first opened for business in 1938 and the place is now run by the 3rd generation LIm family. I hope the next time I return, the coffee would regain its oomph. Click to read more...