Wednesday, October 16, 2013

An Arabic Slap On The Face Of The Malaysian Religious Ultras?

This seems like an Arabian slap on the face of the Malaysian religious ultras who, if they could have their way, might also want to claim exclusivity to god himself.

I don't know. It is possible.

And I also don't want to wade into the debate.

As far as I am concerned, if god exists, you could very well call him by whatever name and if god is omnipotent, he should very well be able to know that you are praying to him, or not.

Or whether you are just making fun of him.

That shouldn't be a problem to an almighty god.

As I understand it, the Court of Appeal has decided that Malaysian Christians can't use the A word in their worship of the Christian god because in their reasoning, inter alia, that would amount to propagating Christianity to Malaysian Muslims and that would be against the Malaysian constitution.

All that I want to say is that the question to be asked should not be a hypothetical one to be asked and answered hypothetically.

The question to be asked is in what way and how does the use of the A word by the East Malaysian Christians in their church worship amount to propagating Christianity to Malaysian Muslim brothers and sisters?

The East Malaysian Christians have been using the A word in their worship for 80 or 100 so years and it had not caused any disquiet to anyone until recently when certain quarters saw it fit to flog the issue for whatever reason they thought served their political purpose.

Did anyone seriously determine whether the burning of the churches was a result of a general disquiet of the Muslim community or the work of some trouble makers sponsored by quarters with a political agenda to advance, by devilishly exploiting religion?

Because, if we base our decision merely on the what a small group of trouble makers do or opine, then we are allowing the tyranny of the few to rule the many, our constitution and our lives.

And that would be tragic.

Very tragic.

And dangerous.

Maybe Certainly ungodly too, to boot.

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