Monday, March 26, 2012

Why The Malays Are Not Doing Well

There is an interesting post over at Malaysia Chronicle.

The writer who says that he/she is an enlightened Malay tries to explain why Malays aren't doing as well as they should with all the privileges they enjoy as bumiputras and all the crutches they are given.

The reason? A four letter word.

For those who are interested to find out what that word is click here.

4 comments:

  1. It's amazing that in 50 years the Chinese in Malaysia went from 45% to 25% of the population. One wonders why the Chinese and the Indians who were the majority 50 years ago .. allowed this to happen. Out of the 2 million Chinese who left Malaysia, one is doing very well as a politician in my city. I'll meet him in May for a China-Canada project.
    P.S. my first interest in Malaysia was after communicating with a Chinese woman working temporarily Beijing. Her family left Malaysia to settle in Perth, Australia.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Giora, there are a number of reasons.

      But mostly it is politics - dirty politics.

      Following the May 13 1969 racial clashes, which the establishment conveniently blamed on the Chinese opposition then but discerning Malaysians believe were instigated by certain vested Malay interests, policies were passed to give the Malays certain advantages. The Chinese were not against Malays being given a helping hand. But it was and still is the unfair and overzealous implementation of the policies which squeezed out the Chinese on many fronts including education, the civil service and government contracts that caused many Chinese to emigrate.

      Another reason is weak Chinese representation in the government in the form of MCA (Malaysian Chinese Association) who claims to represent the Malaysian Chinese interest but few Chinese believe the crap. Many are in there to feather their own nests and only pay lip service to their claim.

      They are so helpless that for forty over years the Malaysian Chinese Association has not been able to help the Chinese education community to persuade the government to solve the issue of the lack of qualified Chinese teachers in the remaining Chinese vernacular schools. Instead, the Umno-led government has seen it fit to send Malay teachers who can't speak Chinese to teach in the vernacular schools instead! And what has MCA being able to do?

      Matters came to a head recently, when the Chinese education community held a meeting to highlight their problem to the public and when a member of the MCA who is also the deputy education minister turned up uninvited, he was roundly booed and chased off!

      That is how well the MCA is representing the Chinese in Malaysia!

      But the irony is that despite all the props for the Malays, they are not doing as well as they should. And the reason is that the privileged few in Umno, derisively known as Umnoputras, and their cronies benefit most from the policies that are supposed to help the Malays as a whole. For example, lucrative public contracts are awarded to a narrow circle of cronies and families who get fat at the expense of the public and the Malays at large.

      Matters

      Delete
  2. Maybe your best strategy for getting greater political power for Chinese Malays is to connect with mainland China. Just today, China and Malaysia opened a joint industrial park in southern China .. where your PM Najib praised the Chinese for investing also in Malaysia. China is the powerful force in Asia and it's in their interest to have a strong Chinese population in every Asian country .. extending China into these countries. Do you have a China-Malaysia Business Association in Kuala Lampoor? That's a good place to make connections.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We do. But China is not interested in the internal affairs of other countries. And Malaysian Chinese too are not interested in China meddling in Malaysian affairs. We just need to vote in a new government who would engage with and deal more fairly with the Chinese here. After all, we are all Malaysians, irrespective of race.

      Delete

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Kluang's Little Bangsar

Kluang's Little Bangsar
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Yasmin Ahmad - Click To Visit
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Kluang Town - Click To Visit
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