Thursday, February 23, 2012

China International Adoption

Because of China's one child policy and the Chinese parents' preference for a male child, many Chinese baby girls are abandoned each year. This makes for a ready pool of children for international adoption.

It seems that America is the country that has adopted the most number of Chinese children. Some 60 over thousand children have been adopted by American families from 1991-2005 alone. Spain is the next country with the most number of children adopted from China. Check it out here.

Apparently Chinese orphanages and welfare homes have done a commendable job looking after the abandoned babies. And it is a good thing that China's international adoption rules are quite stringent.

For example, an American couple planning to adopt must not be less than 30 years old and both must not be older than 50 years, must be physically and mentally fit, have no criminal record, must have annual income of $10,000 per household member, must have family assets of at least $80,000, have no more than 5 children under 18 years of age and the youngest must be at least 1 year old among some other qualifications.  The process may take a few years and includes home study review by a social worker.

However, in the light of China's tightening regulations, the number of international adoptions has gone down.

The first time (often called gotcha day) the adoptive parents and child meet is often an emotional and teary affair. The child will usually cry and sometimes bawl. She will look away from the adoptive parent who holds her. Some, however, after some hesitation do bond well with her adoptive parents.

Click here for a gotcha day you tube video.

Click here to see a cute child bonding well with her adoptive mother.

Click here to see the rarer case of a male child adoption.

Click here for a follow up video where a 4 year old child talks about her adoption, her struggle against chronic hepatitis B and the treatment she had to undergo and her adoptive family.

As a Chinese myself, I would like to say a BIG THANK YOU to the families who have adopted a Chinese child and given her a home, love and family.

May you all be blessed.

4 comments:

  1. Spain as a next country with the most adoptions from China was a suprise for me. I wonder why Spain? Those videos are somehow sad and hopeful at the same time..

    ReplyDelete
  2. I don't know why Spain is the next country with the most adoptions from China. I like to know why too. Gotcha day is often a sad and yet hopeful day like you said. The child is often confused and scared. But follow up videos of the child interacting with her adoptive family often show a happy child and I am glad for this. What is happening in China is a sad thing but international adoptions may be the next best thing and I am grateful where the adoptive families take good care of their adopted children. Thanks for visiting orange_rain.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great videos. Vienna is so cute in the second one, and the mother planning to adopt the boy in the third video is so happy and emotional is nice to see how happy she is, although the boy isn't sure what is going on. I'm also surprised why Spain is high on the list, Canada should be second because we have large Chinese population here in tow big cities and the chinese kids will feel at home. I understand that China has one child policy, but I read that some upper class Chinese want to have more children and the Chinese government should allow them to adopt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Giora, I so agree with you. The first meeting is usually a teary affair. Vienna is really cute. You should get to some follow up videos of Vienna adjusting well and being so happy with her adoptive parents. I myself had also thought that Canada would be the country with the second largest number of adoptions from China instead of Spain. And I also agree that China should allow its own citizens who want and can afford to, to adopt Chinese children themselves. That would be better all round for the children. But with growing prosperity, it seems that nowadays Chinese families are more accepting of having a daughter instead of only wanting a son.

      Delete

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